October 17 @ 2 Chronicles 21-24

2 Chronicles 21-24 (NLT link) 

Discover His heart: He loves when our guidance directs others to dependence on Him

A lot of families carry some bad blood in them due to jealousy or unfaithfulness.  Often communication is nonexistent, and sometimes crimes are committed.  However, nothing I’ve heard really holds a candle to a Queen Mother who so desperately desired to rule a nation that she killed all her grandchildren and other heirs to make it happen.  But then what would you expect from the daughter of Jezebel.

The story of the early years of King Joash is about as exciting as they come, and I’m sure the movie industry has produced some variation of it through the years.  Jehosheba, the aunt of Joash, hid him as a baby from wicked the Queen Mother Athaliah when she was on her killing spree.  He was raised by the faithful priest Jehoiada who mentored him through the years and encouraged many Godly reforms for Israel.  Unfortunately, all of Jehoiada’s reforms and counseling did not bring the final results he desired. 

@2 Chronicles 24
“Jehoiada lived to a very old age, finally dying at 130.  He was buried among the kings in the City of David, because he had done so much good in Judah for God and his Temple.  But after Jehoiada’s death, the leaders of Judah came and bowed before King Joash and persuaded him to listen to their advice. They decided to abandon the Temple of the Lord, the God of their ancestors, and they worshiped Asherah poles and idols instead!” (15-18)  It seems Joash did not have a love for God like his mentor Jehoiada.

The specific training and guidance given Joash by Jehoiada are sketchy in the Bible, and because of that I offer no criticism, but apparently, something went terribly wrong in the process.  Some mentees are resistant to the guidance offered to them or choose not to respond favorably to it.  Some mentors have difficulty releasing those they are helping by allowing them to fly on their own.  Mentoring and counseling are serious undertakings, and I’ve never taken the task lightly.

Guiding young hearts in their move forward through life with positive results is challenging, yet so very rewarding.  This is especially true when we see them move past the handicaps of difficult families or circumstances to become thriving adults.  I know I’ve been successful as a mentor when I’m no longer needed.

As Christian mentors, our goal is not for others to be dependent on us forever, even though it may affirm us and make us feel needed.  Our goal is to lead those we mentor to a dependency on the Lord, where they are able to trust His guidance in their lives.  The greatest reward comes when they have matured to the point of teaching and mentoring others.  I would imagine that the apostle Paul was busting his buttons, so to speak, at the fruitful ministry of his young charge, Timothy.  May button-busting be in your future!

Moving Forward:  Once again I am challenged by the role of mentor, praying that my guidance directs others to a dependency on the Lord and not to me.  They deserve to follow the very best, and that could only be Him!

Tomorrow @ Psalm 120-121

  One thought on “October 17 @ 2 Chronicles 21-24

  1. October 17, 2018 at 6:00 am

    Fortunately, we are only responsible for our role, whether raising children, mentoring or witnessing. The response is in the hands of those with whom we are interacting. That fact actually takes a lot of pressure off. We do our best with the right heart, pray and trust the Lord. Love hearing from you, Nina!

  2. Nina Koett
    October 17, 2018 at 5:36 am

    The bottom line is that no matter how good the mentors/parents are, the choice remains with the mentees/children. Adam and Eve were mentored by God Himself, lived in the garden of Eden – yet still chose to sin.

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